Demystifying In-House Lens Finishing with Dr. Kristopher A. May

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Are you considering implementing an in-house edging system but unsure where to start or how to quantify the savings?

Join us for a non-CE webinar highlighting how adding in-house lens finishing can save you money and increase profits!

Attendees of the webinar will explore:
• The steps to set up an in-house lens finishing system
• How to optimize your profits
• How an easy-to-use edging system like Briot Couture can simplify the process for you.
• And more...


ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Kristopher A. May, OD, FAAO is a graduate of Southern College of Optometry and completed a residency in ocular disease as well as his fellowship with the American Academy of Optometry.

He served as center director for West Tennessee Eye Care and team eyecare provider for both the Memphis Grizzlies and the St. Louis Cardinals Triple-A affiliate Memphis Redbirds. Kris now owns a group private practice with three offices in north Mississippi.

He serves as adjunct and guest faculty at Southern College of Optometry and co-chair of the Mississippi Optometric Association Legislative Committee. He is head cook for the competition barbecue team The Memphis Squeal and Pit Master of The MoodyQues, finishing in the top 10 and top 20 in the world in pork shoulder at the Memphis in May World Championship BBQ Competition.


ABOUT VISIONIX

Visionix is the global manufacturer and exclusive provider of Optovue OCT/OCT-A devices, multimodal Visionix screening and refraction systems, and Briot and Weco lens finishing equipment.

Our goal is to improve access to a complete suite of advanced visual health solutions that transform the patient experience. Today, we are proud to offer devices like the Optovue Solix OCT-A and a wide range of multimodal technologies designed to facilitate the diagnosis and management of a range of ocular diseases. Our new Tele-Optometry Program with 20/20NOW introduces more options to grow your practice with Visionix while keeping the doctor in control of the full patient care experience.

We are pioneers in integrating core refractive, screening, and imaging technologies to address the ever-changing needs of eye care professionals. With over 100 years of innovation, as well as a new level of support and clinical education, we are well-positioned to help you unlock your potential.
 
Will this be relevant if we have a Santinelli?
 
I'd like to hear what he has to say on his own. Would he qualify for a CEWire lecture? -Charlie
 
There's nothing mystical about in house finishing. About as mystical as edging your lawn.
And yet there are finer points to everything. (I edged my lawn tonight.) :)

IMG_1939.jpg
 
And yet there are finer points to everything. (I edged my lawn tonight.) :)
Not sure that would be called in-house edging.

Maybe external-house edging. It looks like you did a fine job. Are you a fan of Preen?
 
Not sure that would be called in-house edging.

Maybe external-house edging. It looks like you did a fine job. Are you a fan of Preen?
I have no idea what Preen is.

1. : to groom with the bill. a bird preening its feathers. 2. : to make one's appearance neat and tidy.
 
Yeah, when I hired a yard crew my wife promptly fired them for using RoundUp. So here I am. -Charlie
 
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Yeah, when I hired a yard crew my wife promptly fired them for using RoundUp. So here I am. -Charlie
McD got the right picture(s)

You can do your RoundUp by hand, then when you get it nicely cleaned up add some Preen about every 10-12 weeks. It prevents germination of new seeds, thus stops the weeds and keeps flower beds, mulch beds and stone beds more manageable.
 
And now back to edging.

Is this procedure used in most optometric practices? Who does the edging. Does it require a trained optician?
 
We have a trained optician that does our IOF. I feel it has made him a much stronger optician. He grew up in the gamer generation, and is a wizard on anything with screens and need for digital input. He can key in the variables faster than the machine can display them, and when it finally catches up, it is actually correct.

He is also very good with multi tasking and does not have to stand there and watch the lens go round and round (one of my prior guys would do that to kill time).
 
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I'm re-opening it! I just ask people to please try to keep this thread on track until the show on wednesday -- to use this space for questions that I can have in hand & ask at the webinar.

Then you can talk lawn care all you want (and just as an aside, roundup has been banned here -- when you guys say 'use it by hand', you don't really mean it literally I hope? :eek: )
 
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Got a question. My optician tells me that some of the new very high end ARs slip, no matter what pads, no matter what chuck pressure, no matter what type of chuck, conventional vs. swivel.

Is it possible the roughing wheel needs to be updated, or maybe are these new ARs all so ultra slippery.

Here is our cut count:

BTW--that poly with AR never slips.


1716238526806.png
 
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Thanks to Dr. May for putting on a great show. The webinar archive is now available in the first post of this thread.

Feel free to ask follow-up questions here

-- adam
 
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Got a question. My optician tells me that some of the new very high end ARs slip, no matter what pads, no matter what chuck pressure, no matter what type of chuck, conventional vs. swivel.

Is it possible the roughing wheel needs to be updated, or maybe are these new ARs all so ultra slippery.

Here is our cut count:

BTW--that poly with AR never slips.


View attachment 43291
Joe are your lenses powder-coated? that was the ultimate fix when we use to edge in house
 
Joe are your lenses powder-coated? that was the ultimate fix when we use to edge in house
Not sure? Is the power coating a temporary process to help bind the lenses while doing the edging process?

Back in the day the early generation ARs were really not that great and they were not very durable, and seemed not very slippery. The newest very durable ARs seem to be the ones that give us the most trouble with slippage. They are also the most expensive, so we do not want to blow these costly lenses.
 
dr schoen (sp) gave some great advice when he was teaching. memphis lab etc at the time. where to get uncuts. always have a an edger. hes a legend
 
Not sure? Is the power coating a temporary process to help bind the lenses while doing the edging process?

Back in the day the early generation ARs were really not that great and they were not very durable, and seemed not very slippery. The newest very durable ARs seem to be the ones that give us the most trouble with slippage. They are also the most expensive, so we do not want to blow these costly lenses.
yes. you have to clean it off after finishing the job. makes all the difference. when I used to edge wouldnt use companies that didnt have powder coated uncuts. all of laramy-k had this at the time. the essilors of the world etc didnt at the time. I have no idea whats out there now
 
all of laramy-k had this at the time. the essilors of the world etc didnt at the time. I have no idea whats out there now
That sounds worth looking into. The Laramy-K people sound like they do amazing work. They have an amazing optician, John, that does incredible videos. I do know that they do not do VSP or EM.

We have been using a lot of product from Zeiss lab in Kentucky. My son tells me that their customer service has gone from bad to abysmal. We need to look for a replacement.
 
theres a hoya lab in knoxville that is supposedly pretty good. not sure what your thoughts on hoya are... Keiner has one Im sure
 
The webinar was quite informative, and Kris May is a great speaker.
 
dr schoen (sp) gave some great advice when he was teaching. memphis lab etc at the time. where to get uncuts. always have a an edger. hes a legend
His advice to me was NEVER give a hyperope their full rx. Always cut it at least a quarter on presbyopes and a full half on younger folks unless you just want a crapload of remakes. On just old school optometry, you'd be hard pressed to find a better source...or on meat because he had an amazing butcher and would from time to time give a couple of us steaks that looked like they came off a dinosaur.
 
His advice to me was NEVER give a hyperope their full rx. Always cut it at least a quarter on presbyopes and a full half on younger folks unless you just want a crapload of remakes. On just old school optometry, you'd be hard pressed to find a better source...or on meat because he had an amazing butcher and would from time to time give a couple of us steaks that looked like they came off a dinosaur.
Hopefully..they still TEACH some Olde School Optometry!!!!!!!
 
Hopefully..they still TEACH some Olde School Optometry!!!!!!!
Understand that any praise I heap upon my alma mater is based on my experience 25 years ago, but the one thing SCO did better than almost anyone is just pumping out good, clinical practitioners. We were garbage at research (sorry, Dr Conner and all due respect to your testosterone creams), but in terms of pumping out "in the trenches" optometrists, I'd stack SCO against anyone. They focused as much on disease as anyone, but hammered us with old school vision correction too.
 
I remember a really good lesson from one of the staff doctors on a patient that I was so proud of myself for finding MEWDS and knowing what to do and what to say. He said "excellent work, now how are you going to make her SEE better? That's why she's in your chair. It's vital to be thorough and find all of this kind of stuff, but never forget that glaucoma patients also want to walk out SEEING BETTER. You can save a patient's life, but if they leave seeing 20/40, they're going to find another doctor so don't think that part is somehow less or beneath you as an EYE doctor."

It's stuck with me for 27 years now and it's always at the forefront of my thinking. At the end of the day, all of this disease detection and treatment is to preserve and maximize VISION and if you leave them seeing poorly, you failed.
 
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I remember a really good lesson from one of the staff doctors on a patient that I was so proud of myself for finding MEWDS and knowing what to do and what to say. He said "excellent work, now how are you going to make her SEE better? That's why she's in your chair. It's vital to be thorough and find all of this kind of stuff, but never forget that glaucoma patients also want to walk out SEEING BETTER. You can save a patient's life, but if they leave seeing 20/40, they're going to find another doctor so don't think that part is somehow less or beneath you as an EYE doctor."

It's stuck with me for 27 years now and it's always at the forefront of my thinking. At the end of the day, all of this disease detection and treatment is to preserve and maximize VISION and if you leave them seeing poorly, you failed.
A lesson that might be lost on newer grads...........

"yes..you saved my life..but I still can't see well......" "but..we are getting close.."
 
Always cut it at least a quarter on presbyopes and a full half on younger folks unless you just want a crapload of remakes.
Ciliary tonus. A degree of accommodation that's baked in. Can't relax it.

"Ciliary tonus Refers to the degree of contraction present in the ciliary muscles when not undergoing active contraction in response to a stimulus."
 
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