Go With The Electrodiagnostic Flow: Adding ERG/VEP Testing to Your Practice with Dr. Craig Thomas

AdminWolf

Site Administrator & Tech Lead
Staff member
Feb 24, 2001
16,780
3,350
113
School/Org
University of Michigan Medical School
City
Lake Oswego
State
OR

In this ODwire.org Webinar, Craig Thomas, OD discusses how he uses the RETeval ERG/VEP testing device to help diagnose and treat eye disease in his office.

RETeval is the only FDA Cleared, Non-Mydriatic Full-Field ERG device.

You will learn how to integrate this hand-held vision-testing technology into your practice's diagnostic protocols and how to use the information in your medical decision-making.

Billing and coding for visual electrophysiology are also discussed.

A Q&A follows the talk; Don't miss it!

Discuss the webinar below.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Steve Silberberg

AdminWolf

Site Administrator & Tech Lead
Staff member
Feb 24, 2001
16,780
3,350
113
School/Org
University of Michigan Medical School
City
Lake Oswego
State
OR
Thanks again to Craig and to everyone who showed up tonight -- it was great getting back to "normal" after a couple of decidedly abnormal weeks.

As mentioned in the webinar, Konan is offering 6-months of no payments & no interest if you decide to purchase an instrument.

Visit their site for details!
 

Michael R. Young O.D.

Well-Known Member
Dec 14, 2010
513
298
63
School/Org
Pacific University College of Optometry
City
Redding
State
CA
I have had this instrument for about two years and find it valuable for clinical use in my practice. Just received a clinical interpretation guide from LKC that is a good primer on the results and how to analyze the results.
 

Attachments

  • Clinical Interpretation_RETeval Device_US_8_2020_final.pdf
    1.8 MB · Views: 841

AdminWolf

Site Administrator & Tech Lead
Staff member
Feb 24, 2001
16,780
3,350
113
School/Org
University of Michigan Medical School
City
Lake Oswego
State
OR
I have had this instrument for about two years and find it valuable for clinical use in my practice. Just received a clinical interpretation guide from LKC that is a good primer on the results and how to analyze the results.
Thanks Dr. Young, this is really valuable! I hope they are bundling this PDF with the instrument these days!
 

david gross od

Active Member
Dec 28, 2008
227
25
28
School/Org
suny
City
new york,new york
State
ny
I’m considering this instrument. Thanks Dr Thomas. Excellent lecture. I like the way you test patients to see what’s going on. Who knows what we’re missing???
 

G Chad Green

Member
Feb 11, 2006
29
0
1
www.greenfamilyeyecare.com
School/Org
UAB School of Optometry
City
Demopolis
State
AL
Thank you.

We use it several times per day...

Craig,

How does this unit compare to the Diopsys? I have had the Diopsys unit in my main office for several years. I am needing to add electrodiagnostics in my satellite office. Intriqued by this one because of the size.

Thanks.

Chad
 

Craig Steinberg OD JD

Well-Known Member
Jul 10, 2009
24,881
8,039
113
Los Angeles, California
www.csteinberglaw.com
School/Org
UMSL
City
Agoura Hills
State
CA
A couple of cautionary points to remember.

Because electrodiagnostics are relatively uncommon in eye care generally and optometry in particular, its use increases your audit risk from third party payers. So do not take shortcuts in your documentation. Scribbles and cryptic notes don’t cut it. Be sure you have appropriate history, clinical signs, and/or symptoms that are also clearly indicated in your written order for the test (that is, they are in your record AND then in your order you refer to them), and be sure you prepare a good interpretation and report that describes how the findings are relevant to or impacting your management of the patient. Avoid references to “rule out” or “ruling out” in your reasons for the tests.

Remember that you are being paid for BOTh doing the test AND interpreting it. Document both as if you KNOW your record will be audited by someone looking for an excuse to deny payment.

It is helpful to create and have a small library (Manila folder) where you keep peer reviewed studies that support the use of the tests for various conditions so you are armed to respond to an insurance denial. A report or story in an optometric or OMD journal is nice, but not always accepted as adequate for establishing medical necessity. Published studies are better, but you can never quite seem to find them when you need them. So have a library at hand.

Know your LCDs. There is no better response to a denial for medical necessity than an LCD, and there is no harder appeal to win than when an LCD says it is not covered.

Also, I recommend obtaining an ABM in case a payer denies payment and you cannot get that denial reversed.
 
New Sight Capital