Prescribing from the Chair - Advice from Drs. Jennifer Branning & Rob Szeliga

Discussion in 'ODwire.org TV & Radio' started by AdminWolf, Nov 27, 2019.

  1. AdminWolf

    AdminWolf Site Administrator & Tech Lead
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    At the end of the exam, ODs normally write an Rx for CLs or meds. But for specs, many practices send the patient back to the optical to decide what to purchase.

    Some docs feel that this is a mistake, and instead try to take control of the process while the patient is still in the chair.

    Best Practice 2019 honorees Drs. Jennifer Branning & Rob Szeliga talk to us about how to properly prescribe from the chair, and how it benefits both patients and your practice.

    Leave any questions or comments in this thread!
     
  2. AdminWolf

    AdminWolf Site Administrator & Tech Lead
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    I'm curious as to the approach that most take to this issue in their offices -- in the past, I've been to many where the doc just hands you off with the Rx, and basically the optician takes over the entire process.

    I'm not sure that is in the best interest of the patient (or frankly the practice ...)
     
  3. AdminWolf

    AdminWolf Site Administrator & Tech Lead
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    At around the 5:45 mark in the video, Dr. Szeliga shares the sheet he gives out to patients discussing common eye care terms, why buying onlne may not be a great idea, etc...

    It is well-done and a good idea; curious if people have something similar in their office (?)
     
  4. Paul Farkas

    Paul Farkas Administrator

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    Who is the best marketer in your practice? You or your optician dispenser?

    Do you list in front the patient needs and let them take care of the rest?
    Do you physically write out the eye wear prescription and let the optician perform the upselling options?

    In spite of all your efforts are patients walking to an alternative source for the eye wear?

    Do you offer a less expensive alternative before the patient walks?

    Since your dispensary has been, up to now a profit center, these sensitive issues should be discussed.
     
  5. AdminWolf

    AdminWolf Site Administrator & Tech Lead
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    I think one thing that people are objecting to these days -- on principle -- is opacity of pricing, and not being offered alternatives.

    Is the price clearly displayed? is the price broken down by the options being applied?

    Not that this is the same, but ... I just had my garage door openers replaced. I told the guy what I wanted, he quoted me a price for the openers and the installation. Just looking at his numbers, I could tell he was marking up by 10% over what I could order on Amazon. But that was fine -- I did my research, he was within a reasonable range and I felt OK about the transaction. (I suspect of course that he orders his stuff from a distributor vs. a retailer, so his margins are even a little better, but...)

    Now, i'm an educated consumer (I did my research before the guy even showed up), but it would have been better if he had whipped out his phone and showed me not only what the openers would cost me coming from him, but also from Amazon, etc... So I could see that he was being fair.

    Retailers like Best Buy have really leaned into this strategy, going so far as to encouraging you to open up Amazon's app when you're in their stores.

    The idea is by doing this you are communicating value to the customer, and making them feel better about their purchase through transparency.
     
  6. Richard Pagan

    Richard Pagan ODwire.org Supporting Member

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    There are a bazillion options in the optical. We list packages but even that's a bunch of alphabet soup for most consumers.

    The large number of options make it almost impossible for people to price shop apples vs apples. I've had this talk with many pts and the reality is they have very little idea what they are buying.

    Whether its the highest possible grade material that we offer or the worst possible grade that some craptical offers. IMO, its because of that confusion that the crapticals of the world "get away with it"
     
    Frederick Frost likes this.
  7. Frederick Frost

    Frederick Frost ODwire.org Supporting Member

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    I have not had a chance to finish the video but will do so shortly. When a patient is in exam room and I asked them questions about their hobbies, the problems they are having their work computer digital usage etc. I make recommendations which would ideally solve the problems they go to the dispensary I walk them out and give them to the person that will help them and I explain to them what I have talked about and what we recommend and then I let the person help them with frame selection multiple pairs if they want etc.We have a price list that we take out when figuring up charges so patient see where price transparent. I’ve also indicated that I’ve taken the contact lens price list and show patients with their contacts are so again they know there’s no funny business going on.

    We have a price list that we take out when figuring up charges so patient do we are price transparent.

    I’ve also indicated that I’ve taken the contact lens pricelist and showing patients with their contacts are so again they know there’s no funny business going on.

    However, we do not price compare. The reason is similar to what Richard said, the anti-reflective coating in our office is not the same as when you buy from Walmart or other places. How do I know that? I was out at a nursing home today out of town and my contact person and got new glasses and I asked her how she liked them and she said they were OK but the glare coating is already scratched I’ve only had them a little over a month. I told her it should be under warranty and she said yes but it’s only one time and my other pair older pair did the exact same thing. It is obvious they are using an inferior anti-reflective coating, and even if they are charging less than us which I don’t know what they charge and don’t care, they’re giving people crap. With my current vendors I have had only one pair of anti-reflective lens is scratched and that was physical scratching not crazing and that is in more than a year and a half. And we prescribe a ton of anti-reflective coating.

    When you go into Tiffany’s, they don’t pull out a price comparison sheet to some local pawnshop. You’re in Tiffany’s. If you don’t want to go to Tiffany’s, go to the pawnshop. You might find something there you like really cheap, and you can brag to your friends how much money you saved until something happens

    All i’m trying to do with my practice is create superior products, give a superior experience, and a place to go when you want something that’s going to be great and it’s going to last, and it’s backed up because it does.

    I am no business guru, but I urge my colleagues do not get caught in the price trap, as the only way to go is spiraling down with the rest of cheap mediocre merchandise that will tarnish your name.
     
  8. William R. Hall

    William R. Hall ODwire.org Supporting Member

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    People who can afford quality will buy quality. Like buying a BMW or Mercedes. People who can't afford quality will buy crap and complain about it. Unfortunately, most people know the difference between a high end car and a economy car but think all AR is the same. Isn't AR just AR? Isn't a potato just a potato? How do you educate the difference?